• Oceania

    Dunner Stunner

    From 2005 to 2007 I moved from my home in London to Dunedin, New Zealand to study at the prestigious University of Otago. I was lucky enough to be accepted based on my A-Levels and applied for my student visa and I was on my way! (Obvs there was lots more planning but that is part of a different post!) Dunedin is a student town towards the south of New Zealand’s South Island, with a student population of about 20% (of its 120000). Dunedin means ‘Edinburgh of the South’ as it originates from the Gaelic for Edinburgh and has a proud Scottish History, with a statue of Robert Burns in…

  • Travel Inspiration

    What Does It Mean to Travel?

    Depending on who you speak to, travel can mean many different things. Typically – or according to my dictionary – travel is to take a journey. This usually is a journey of distance, but for many travels is also emotional and spiritual. A different perspective on your own life, the sincere desire for change or the radical notion of escaping. People travel for health, somewhere sunny to help with mental strength and rest, they move to gain knowledge, to regain their own power and to help others. People go on pilgrimages, seek spiritual enlightenment and to achieve a sense of accomplishment. Not all those who wander are lost – J.R.R…

  • United Kingdom

    Giants and Dragons on the Northern Irish Coast

    On Christmas Eve, two of my girlfriends said that they had booked a super cheap flight to Belfast (£25 return flight) for February to see the Giants Causeway. So, naturally, I decided to gatecrash! We were flying out on Friday night after work and returning Sunday lunchtime, so we arranged a guided coach/tour company for our whistle-stop tour of the Northern Irish Coast. Our first stop was the Bushmills Whiskey Distillery. Bushmills is Ireland’s oldest distillery, operating since 1608 and they have numerous different blends available in their store. Being half-Scottish, I am quite partial to a wee dram so upon our arrival, we decided to have a little tasting…

  • United Kingdom

    On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomond

    O ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road, And I’ll be in Scotland a’fore ye, But me and my true love will never meet again, On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomond My momma was born in Glasgow, and my Granny moved to near Loch Lomond while my mum was still little. Although my Mum has now lived in London since she was 18 when my sister and I were little we used to spend our summer holidays visiting the Loch and nearby Glens. I try to go and visit my wee Granny once a year, and I always take my camera to snap around…

  • Guides

    Abandoned Monochrome

    Dungeness is located on the south coast of England, about 30 mins from Folkestone. I have heard that it is a bit of a haven for photographers, with its slightly dystopian feel. A nuclear power station overshadows derelict fisherman huts and boats on the biggest shingle beach in Europe. The hamlet is home to mainly old wooden houses, many built around old railway coaches, are owned and occupied by fishermen, whose boats lie on the beach. Dungeness is a large nature reserve, given the uniqueness of the habitat, home to many rare birds and vegetation. One-third of all plants found in the UK are seen at Dungeness. Given the aesthetic…

  • Guides

    Capturing Autumnal Colours

    Autumn is perhaps the most photogenic of the seasons with all of the colours, those stunning warm gold and copper tones. Can also get those misty and dewy mornings, but I am not so much of an early bird for photography! Me and two friends heading to Greenwich at the weekend to capture the foliage for Autumn. Greenwich Park is a fantastic location, not just for the trees but the people in the royal park as well. Our response to colour is sophisticated and used well it can be the most powerful element in a photograph. The sensation of colour is multilevel, evoking a mixture of physical, physiological and psychological…

  • United Kingdom

    Breathtaking Belfast

    My father-in-law is initially from Belfast, and my husband used to travel to see his family over there in the 90’s, but this was during the time of the ‘Troubles’ and he never really got to see Belfast. As things have settled since the ‘Good Friday Agreement’ the city is now a buzz of redevelopment and energy as it really opens its doors to the world. We were invited to a family party in Belfast, we thought it would be an excellent opportunity to visit and explore. I had been to Belfast before, for work a couple of times, but sadly travelling for work meant I got to see the…

  • Europe

    Surprises in Milan

    This July I bought my husband a surprise holiday, not only did he not know where we were going but neither did I! We used the prior Expedia service ‘Surprise Trips’ where one of the grand wizards at Expedia found me a holiday based on my budget, airport and number of nights and people. We were told to get to Gatwick for 7am on the day we flew out, only finding out on the way to the airport our destination. Milan! All I knew about Milan was it was famous for fashion, Ferrari’s and football! I never would have thought about Milan as a destination for a city break, would…

  • Europe

    Chocolate, Canals and Cobbles in Bruges

    Last year for my 30th birthday, my husband bought me a weekend away in Bruges. Pretty much all I knew about Bruges before we travelled there was it’s famous for chocolate and its gothic architecture (from the infamous film ‘In Bruges’). We travelled by Eurostar from Ebbsfleet in Kent for a two-night break. We got the Eurostar to Brussels and with a fifteen-minute change over we were on the train to Bruges. I love travelling by train in Europe as it’s so different from my regular British rail commute to London. Walking from the train station to our hotel, which was about 15-20 minutes, we passed through lots of cobbled…