• Oceania

    Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand

    On Koekohe beach, between Dunedin and Oamaru in the South Island of New Zealand, is a natural phenomenon steeped in Maori folklore. The Moeraki Boulders are one of the most photographed landscapes in New Zealand. Numerous wonderfully circular orbs of stone litter the Otago beachside. Local legend says the boulders are the remains of eel baskets, calabashes, and kumara washed ashore from the wreck at nearby Shag Point from a large canoe of Arai-te-Uru. The patterning on the boulders, according to legend, are the remains of the canoe’s fishing nets. Over 50 boulders have been unearthed from the eroding shoreline, with stones still half hidden in the banks of the…

  • Travel Hacks

    How Green Is Your Hotel? Tips For Finding An Environmentally Friendly Resort

    As more people travel and the concerns about the state of the environment and the future of our planet mount, the desire for reducing our carbon footprint and trying to be more green, destinations are aiming to be more environmentally conscious. But how do you know if your resort is green? Here are some things to look out for: Renewable Sources Bit of an obvious one but hotels consume a lot of energy as there are a lot of people. Many are now using renewable sources to reduce their carbon footprint (especially destinations with lots of sun) so look out for solar panels and wind turbines. Master Key Cards Many…

  • London by Locals

    London’s Best Parks

    An unusual seasonal heatwave hits London over a bank holiday weekend; it is like hitting the jackpot! One of the chief joys of London is the numerous green spaces within the labyrinth of old cobbled streets and high rise buildings. Other major cities will have one large park but London has so many, and here are the big five to visit: Greenwich Park For most people who know me, Greenwich is probably my most favourite part of London. Greenwich means ‘green settlement’ in old Saxon, and this park is monumental in honouring the origins of the name. The oldest enclosed royal park in London, covering 180 acres, used to be an old hunting ground.…

  • Europe

    Saklikent Gorge

    Hidden is the Taurus Mountains on the south coast of Turkey a canyon of 300m high and 18km long is carved. Melted water from the snow caps on the mountain tops gush down the steep slopes, dissecting the terrain. The water is thick with limestone from the mountains and ice cold. One of the most massive gorges in the world is found near the tourist destinations of Fethiye and Olu Deniz. During the summer months when the tide is low, you can walk deep into the gorge. The whole day is magical, the sides of the canyon towering over while you wade in the water. What to take with you:…

  • Europe

    Top 7 Things To Do In Budapest

    Budapest is a city of contrast. From the gently sloping hills of ancient Buda to the flat terrain of Pest. With a history of Celtic, Roman and Ottoman occupation, and pivotal during both of the World Wars, Budapest has something for everyone. Here are the top 7 things to do when you visit Budapest 1. Take In The Architecture Of The Parliament Building The outstanding Gothic building on the banks of the Danube is one of the largest buildings in Hungary. Still, a fully functional parliamentary office, stunning from virtually every angle, forming part of the UNESCO site as a central element in the Danube panorama. Tickets are available daily to…

  • Mental Health

    Homesick For Your Foreign Home

    When being away from home, it can be quite familiar to feel symptoms of homesickness. Once the novelty of a new place wears off and the reality of the situation your in hits, homesickness can soon follow. Homesickness is defined as the distress caused by being away from home. Leaving your family, friends and family places can leave you feeling lonely and isolated. When I left London for New Zealand at the age of 18, I expected a degree of homesickness. Moving home for the very first time, and to a country pretty much as far away as possible would not be easy. I didn’t know anyone and going to…

  • Mental Health

    Travelling With Depression – 14 Tips For Your Adventures

    For those with depression, travelling can feel like a fantastic opportunity to feel better. A chance to get a new perspective on life, step out from your comfort zone and feel rejuvenated. While travelling can help you feel all these things, don’t believe that it can be a miracle cure. Sadly depression doesn’t get the memo that it didn’t get the invite for your trip! Stepping out of the mundane daily stress life can help to break the cycle of depression but be realistic that your depression isn’t going to stay at home. Be prepared that an episode may strike and it’s ok if it does. Your depression (or any…

  • Travel Hacks

    Hacks For Booking Flights

    Everyone wants to know when is the best time to book flights because everyone loves a bargain. Noone wants to pay over the odds for a ticket that if they tweaked by a day or even the time of day could have saved them a few quid. Five-Week Rule Flights go on sale 11 months in advance. The best time to book tickets depends on the destination you are travelling to, and the time of year you will be departing. Rule of thumb, the best time to book is five weeks before your departure date, but it is best to watch and monitor the flights on different websites to get…

  • Africa

    Chilling With Penguins In Cape Town

    An hour-long drive from Cape Town southwards, along the coastal road through Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town, lives an unusual family. Hidden in a sheltered bay of granite boulders, resides a colony of African penguins. White sandy beaches, peaceful neighbourhood, plenty of swimming spots, Boulders Beach is the perfect place to settle. A few friendly penguins settled into the beach first in 1982. Now their family has grown, and the colony is almost 3,000 penguins. It is incredible that so many wild creatures have made this little part of the Cape Peninsula their home. Remember they are wild animals, and those beaks are pretty sharp! African penguins are an endangered…

  • Travel Advice

    Top Tips For Staying Safe When Travelling

    Travelling can be such a thrilling experience. Whether it’s because you’re visiting a new culture or getting to meet new people or just having a new adventure. It is important to remember that you need to stay safe while travelling and here are some top tips to look after yourself when away. 1. Do Your Homework Research your destination before your travel. This may be the local cultures and customs, being prepared for what weather you can expect when there and knowing what to look out for. Know how to avoid accidentally offending someone. Be aware of the local scams. 2. Get comprehensive travel insurance and make sure you have…

  • Travel Inspiration

    What Makes A Bucket List?

    The term is thrown around very casually and it seems that everyone has heard of a bucket list but what actually is it? Generally, the most common description is a list of all the things you want to try, goals you want to achieve and life experiences you want to have before you die. Simple right? But where do you even start? First start by really defining what you want in a Bucket List? You can have numerous different bucket lists, whether they are from your home country or places to visit or things to see. Bucket lists make you stop and think what you actually want to experience in this…

  • United Kingdom

    The First Emperor and Liverpool’s China Town​

    The first Chinese immigrants to Liverpool arrived in the 1830s when the first vessel direct from China arrived in Liverpool’s docks to trade such goods as silk and cotton wool. More immigrants came in Liverpool in the late 1860s with the establishment of the Blue Funnel Shipping Line. The commercial shipping line created strong trade links between the cities of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Liverpool; mainly importing silk, cotton and tea. Liverpool is still a twinned city with Shanghai. From the 1890s onwards, small numbers of Chinese began to set up businesses catering to the Chinese sailors and some married working-class British women, resulting in many British-born Eurasian Chinese being…