• Free Things To Do

    Be Inspired at the Imperial War Museum London

    A short walk from Lambeth North tube station in the imposing and impressive Imperial War Museum, with huge military guns guarding the entrance. Originally homed in Crystal Palace from 1917, the idea was to record the civil and military war effort and sacrifice of the British Empire during World War I, before expanding to include all conflicts in which the British Commonwealth have been involved in since 1914. The museum moved to its current home in 1936, what used to be the Bethlem Royal Hospital in Southwark (also known as Bedlam, an infamous psychiatric hospital). Tribute and Sacrifice With the sheer number of young men that sacrificed their lives during…

  • Asia

    Review: Day Trip to the Great Wall of China

    Upon booking our flights to New Zealand was agreed on a 10-hour layover in China. The flights were so cheap with the layover and thought we would hang around in the airport, especially as Beijing is one of the largest terminals in an airport. It wasn’t until I was having a chat with my Mum about her previous layover in Singapore where they have a little bus shuttle from the airport that I started to investigate what our options were. Beijing Layover Tour I stumbled across the 24/144 hour visa-free transit pass, meaning that you can apply at the airport to leave the terminal. A tour company called Beijing Layover…

  • Oceania

    The Ultimate 15 Kiwi Songs for your New Zealand Roadtrip

    One of the most fundamental parts of any road trip is the playlist. Aside from the itinerary and snacks, it is one of the first things that I plan out. Join us in making the perfect New Zealand Playlist as it would not be complete without these great kiwi tunes. Kiwi Roadtrip So True – The Black Seeds With its kiwi infused reggae beats and a catchy chorus, it’s not hard to sing along to this summer classic, even if the sun isn’t shining. The Otherside – Breaks co-op With local legend, Zane Lowe making up part of this trio, the Otherside is a laid-back beach vibe, perfect for cruising around the…

  • Oceania

    Getting Lost in the Rotorua Redwoods

    Rotorua in the central North Island of New Zealand is infamous for its geothermal activity, with the lingering notes of sulphur in the air and its Maori heritage. What maybe isn’t as well known, is the Whakarewarewa or Redwoods Forest alongside the south of Lake Rotorua. An interesting experiment… During the early 20th century, foresters in the area were intrigued as to what northern hemisphere trees would grow in this part of the world, and planted over 170 species as part of an experiment. New Zealand trees tend to grow quite slowly and with an increase in settlers, wood was needed for building shelters and homes. With demand high, a…

  • Oceania

    Experience The Magic Of Middle Earth At Hobbiton

    In a small hole in the ground, once lived a hobbit; and in the small Waikato town of Matamata lives a little magical piece of Middle Earth. Finding Middle Earth When the filming of the Lord of the Rings Trilogy confirmed, the challenge for film markers was finding the perfect set locations for these iconic novels. For many fans of the novels, the Shire was one of the most important locations get right. The Alexander farm on Buckland road was seen by the location scouts from above, with its rolling green hills and large Oak tree at the perfect setting for the Shire of Middle Earth. They could not have…

  • Events,  London

    London’s Top 5 Most Spectacular Fireworks Displays

    London celebrates Guy Fawkes Night every year on the 5th November. This is the day that Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament in a terrorist attack but was foiled. On the weekend closest to the 5th, all over London, there are a number of free or ticketed events to catch a glimpse of some amazing firework displays. North London: Alexandra Palace One of the most famous and iconic firework displays in London, Alexandra Palace in North London also hosts a German Beer Festival and ice rink. There is a nearby train station and then a 15-minute walk or you can get the underground to Wood Green…

  • Events,  London

    London Design Biennale

    A vibrant, ambitious and innovative exhibition by over 40 different countries, regions and territories are currently located in Somerset House, London. With the theme of Emotional States linking all these different pieces together, each has its perspective on emotion. Here are a few of my favourite pieces: Australia – Full Spectrum A rainbow coloured spectrum, with flexible and changing lights, it is said to represent the emotion of love. After Australia legalised same-sex marriage, the designer Flynn Talbot was inspired by the inclusivity of love and the openness of Australia with this piece. Integrating the colours of the LGBTQ+ flag, and the movement of the spectrum shows the progression and…

  • Events,  London

    Triple Review: Instagram tour of London with a social media expert

    I came across Triple.Co while browsing the internet on a typical morning commute (you know what it is like, Alice falling down the rabbit hole!). They offer a number of local run tours in numerous cities across Europe. They appealed to me as I love anything where locals can teach me about my own city and being a guide may be something I consider in the future. It’s sometimes hard to find something to do in your own town and end up doing the same things over and over, so I was looking for inspiration! London Heading over to the London section of the website to browse the various events…

  • United Kingdom

    From Balloch to Tarbet – The West of Loch Lomond

    Where the sun shines fair on the banks of Loch Lomond Britain’s largest loch (or lake) is one of the most beautiful destinations in Scotland (and trust me there are a lot of places to chose from). I have spent many childhood summers visiting my grandparents who are only a 10-minute drive away. Situated in the heart of the ‘Trossachs’ Scotland’s first national park, is a miniature version of the highlands, only an hour from Glasgow. Balloch The start of the Loch Lomond & Trossachs park is Balloch, which has plenty to do and see. Balloch Castle Country Park Initially developed in the early 19th century, the country park and…

  • Getting Around

    Things I Wish People Knew Before Visiting London

    London is my home city, and yes I may be incredibly biased, but there is nowhere else like it. There may be capital cities but none with the history, diversity, and culture of my own, and rightly so we have a plethora of visitors every year. But… (there had to be a but right!) But it frustrates me how everyone’s experience of London could be improved with just a few small changes and some heartfelt advice. This article isn’t meant to be a bitch fit rant at tourists, but a few tips from a local might make your trip a bit calmer! Please let people off the tube before boarding The whole…

  • Travel and Weddings

    Planning Your Destination Wedding

    Five years ago I was able to marry my soulmate in a stunning ceremony in Kalkan, Turkey. We decided to have a destination wedding, not only because we could more certainly guarantee the weather but also the insane costs of having a wedding in the UK (especially in London & the South East). Fortunately, this was an option for us, and we had a destination in mind. Wedding planning can be a particularly stressful experience, especially with distance and language barriers. Here are my first tips for planning a destination wedding: 1. Find your partner! Sounds pretty straightforward but you need to have someone to marry and who shares the…

  • Europe

    When I didn’t have a Spiritual Experience at the Vatican

    For Easter 2012, all the women on my Mum’s side of the family (11 of us in total) went to visit Rome and the Vatican as part of our Grandmother’s 70th Birthday celebrations. Ranging from 75 to 16, all of us were raised Roman Catholics, and we arrived in Rome on the morning on Palm Sunday. Although I am not a practising Catholic, unlike the majority of my family, I was really excited to see the Vatican. I don’t quite know what I expected when I walked into St Peter’s Square, but some sort of religious revelation. The seat of the Holy See and home of the Roman Catholic religion,…

  • Travel Inspiration

    The 40 Before 40 Challenge

    So last week was my 32nd birthday. It was a pretty quiet affair, with a few friends and family for a chilled out Sunday BBQ. Birthdays to me are always a time to reflect upon what I have achieved and lessons learned, but also moving forwards towards new goals and targets. One of the things I want to do is to travel more, which will then be able to provide more content for blogging and build towards that goal. So here I am setting myself a travel challenge. Over a business lunch, my manager mentioned that she was travelling to Malta as part of her personal 50 countries before she turns…

  • Travel Advice,  United Kingdom

    How To Stay Safe During The UK Heatwave

    As the UK enters its longest ever heatwave, it is essential to remember to protect yourself from the sun. Travel safety is critical, with everyone being savvier overseas, but not considering that the UK sun can be just as hot! Here are the top tips for staying safe this summer The main risks associated with the current heatwave are dehydration, overheating and sunburn or sunstroke. If you are vulnerable to heat, stay in the shade between 11 am and 3 pm. This time is the hottest part of the day. Regularly drink cold drinks such as water, and avoid alcohol and caffeinated beverages. Wear loose cool clothing. Make sure you wear a…

  • Travel,  Travel Inspiration

    Travel Quotes To Actually Inspire Travel

    You’ve seen them flashed all over your Instagram feed and numerous Pinterest boards for quotes to spark your wanderlust and inspire the traveller in you. There are so many quotes to choose from. For me, it is the story and origin of the quote that makes it meaningful. Give a perspective on a quote, it can make it more purposeful and insightful. Flaubert was an influential French novelist in the 19th century. He believed in finding just the right word for his prose and revealed in romanticism and realism. Innovative, Flaubert quotes here the truth, no cliché, just delicate yet powerful. The world is such an enormous place, but getting…

  • Free Things To Do

    Harry Potter Studio Tour

    I started reading the Harry Potter series in 2001 when the first four books were published. I read them so greedily, pouring myself into the pages and escaping into another world. I was captivated and truly enchanted. I never went as far as queuing up at midnight for the next book or dressing up for the upcoming film (which is totes fine btw), but I was and still am a huge fan of the universe. So naturally, when Warner Bros at Pinewood opened the doors to how the magic was made on the big screen, I definitely wanted to visit and see for myself. The Making of Harry Potter is located…

  • London by Locals

    Barbican, London

    A brutalist concrete jungle casts shadows over the City of London. An ambitious community project from the 1960s oozes with character and charm. Formerly a gateway to the London Wall, an original part of Roman Londonium. Incredibly part of the wall still survives as you walk around the complex. Population blossomed in the area during the 1850s, as did the ‘rag trade’ or textiles markets, especially at the Cripplegate end of the Barbican complex. Devasted during World War II, the area was rebuilt in the 1960s. The idea was to populate the city, to build a community in the heart of the tragedy of the devastation. Brilliantly ambitious to create…

  • London

    Best Songs About London

    With Manchester and Liverpool representing English pop music for decades, it is easy to forget that the Capital City has produced some fantastic artists and provided the inspiration for many incredible songs. Here is just a selection: ‘A Foggy Day (In London Town)’ – Ella Fitzgerald ‘London: the best place on Earth to be miserable’ surely resonates with the majority of commuters stuck on a crowded and delay train/tube/bus. Ms. Fitzgerald beautifully croons on this number which has been covered by many artists, about the infamous fog that would haunt the capital, but the sun is always shining. ‘American Boy’ – Estelle feat. Kanye West London born Estelle uses a…

  • Oceania

    Moeraki Boulders, New Zealand

    On Koekohe beach, between Dunedin and Oamaru in the South Island of New Zealand, is a natural phenomenon steeped in Maori folklore. The Moeraki Boulders are one of the most photographed landscapes in New Zealand. Numerous wonderfully circular orbs of stone litter the Otago beachside. Local legend says the boulders are the remains of eel baskets, calabashes, and kumara washed ashore from the wreck at nearby Shag Point from a large canoe of Arai-te-Uru. The patterning on the boulders, according to legend, are the remains of the canoe’s fishing nets. Over 50 boulders have been unearthed from the eroding shoreline, with stones still half hidden in the banks of the…

  • Travel Hacks

    How Green Is Your Hotel? Tips For Finding An Environmentally Friendly Resort

    As more people travel and the concerns about the state of the environment and the future of our planet mount, the desire for reducing our carbon footprint and trying to be more green, destinations are aiming to be more environmentally conscious. But how do you know if your resort is green? Here are some things to look out for: Renewable Sources Bit of an obvious one but hotels consume a lot of energy as there are a lot of people. Many are now using renewable sources to reduce their carbon footprint (especially destinations with lots of sun) so look out for solar panels and wind turbines. Master Key Cards Many…

  • London by Locals

    London’s Best Parks

    An unusual seasonal heatwave hits London over a bank holiday weekend; it is like hitting the jackpot! One of the chief joys of London is the numerous green spaces within the labyrinth of old cobbled streets and high rise buildings. Other major cities will have one large park but London has so many, and here are the big five to visit: Greenwich Park For most people who know me, Greenwich is probably my most favourite part of London. Greenwich means ‘green settlement’ in old Saxon, and this park is monumental in honouring the origins of the name. The oldest enclosed royal park in London, covering 180 acres, used to be an old hunting ground.…

  • Europe

    Saklikent Gorge

    Hidden is the Taurus Mountains on the south coast of Turkey a canyon of 300m high and 18km long is carved. Melted water from the snow caps on the mountain tops gush down the steep slopes, dissecting the terrain. The water is thick with limestone from the mountains and ice cold. One of the most massive gorges in the world is found near the tourist destinations of Fethiye and Olu Deniz. During the summer months when the tide is low, you can walk deep into the gorge. The whole day is magical, the sides of the canyon towering over while you wade in the water. What to take with you:…

  • Europe

    Top 7 Things To Do In Budapest

    Budapest is a city of contrast. From the gently sloping hills of ancient Buda to the flat terrain of Pest. With a history of Celtic, Roman and Ottoman occupation, and pivotal during both of the World Wars, Budapest has something for everyone. Here are the top 7 things to do when you visit Budapest 1. Take In The Architecture Of The Parliament Building The outstanding Gothic building on the banks of the Danube is one of the largest buildings in Hungary. Still, a fully functional parliamentary office, stunning from virtually every angle, forming part of the UNESCO site as a central element in the Danube panorama. Tickets are available daily to…

  • Mental Health

    Homesick For Your Foreign Home

    When being away from home, it can be quite familiar to feel symptoms of homesickness. Once the novelty of a new place wears off and the reality of the situation your in hits, homesickness can soon follow. Homesickness is defined as the distress caused by being away from home. Leaving your family, friends and family places can leave you feeling lonely and isolated. When I left London for New Zealand at the age of 18, I expected a degree of homesickness. Moving home for the very first time, and to a country pretty much as far away as possible would not be easy. I didn’t know anyone and going to…

  • Mental Health

    Travelling With Depression – 14 Tips For Your Adventures

    For those with depression, travelling can feel like a fantastic opportunity to feel better. A chance to get a new perspective on life, step out from your comfort zone and feel rejuvenated. While travelling can help you feel all these things, don’t believe that it can be a miracle cure. Sadly depression doesn’t get the memo that it didn’t get the invite for your trip! Stepping out of the mundane daily stress life can help to break the cycle of depression but be realistic that your depression isn’t going to stay at home. Be prepared that an episode may strike and it’s ok if it does. Your depression (or any…

  • Travel Hacks

    Hacks For Booking Flights

    Everyone wants to know when is the best time to book flights because everyone loves a bargain. Noone wants to pay over the odds for a ticket that if they tweaked by a day or even the time of day could have saved them a few quid. Five-Week Rule Flights go on sale 11 months in advance. The best time to book tickets depends on the destination you are travelling to, and the time of year you will be departing. Rule of thumb, the best time to book is five weeks before your departure date, but it is best to watch and monitor the flights on different websites to get…

  • Africa

    Chilling With Penguins In Cape Town

    An hour-long drive from Cape Town southwards, along the coastal road through Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town, lives an unusual family. Hidden in a sheltered bay of granite boulders, resides a colony of African penguins. White sandy beaches, peaceful neighbourhood, plenty of swimming spots, Boulders Beach is the perfect place to settle. A few friendly penguins settled into the beach first in 1982. Now their family has grown, and the colony is almost 3,000 penguins. It is incredible that so many wild creatures have made this little part of the Cape Peninsula their home. Remember they are wild animals, and those beaks are pretty sharp! African penguins are an endangered…

  • Travel Advice

    Top Tips For Staying Safe When Travelling

    Travelling can be such a thrilling experience. Whether it’s because you’re visiting a new culture or getting to meet new people or just having a new adventure. It is important to remember that you need to stay safe while travelling and here are some top tips to look after yourself when away. 1. Do Your Homework Research your destination before your travel. This may be the local cultures and customs, being prepared for what weather you can expect when there and knowing what to look out for. Know how to avoid accidentally offending someone. Be aware of the local scams. 2. Get comprehensive travel insurance and make sure you have…

  • Travel Inspiration

    What Makes A Bucket List?

    The term is thrown around very casually and it seems that everyone has heard of a bucket list but what actually is it? Generally, the most common description is a list of all the things you want to try, goals you want to achieve and life experiences you want to have before you die. Simple right? But where do you even start? First start by really defining what you want in a Bucket List? You can have numerous different bucket lists, whether they are from your home country or places to visit or things to see. Bucket lists make you stop and think what you actually want to experience in this…

  • United Kingdom

    The First Emperor and Liverpool’s China Town​

    The first Chinese immigrants to Liverpool arrived in the 1830s when the first vessel direct from China arrived in Liverpool’s docks to trade such goods as silk and cotton wool. More immigrants came in Liverpool in the late 1860s with the establishment of the Blue Funnel Shipping Line. The commercial shipping line created strong trade links between the cities of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Liverpool; mainly importing silk, cotton and tea. Liverpool is still a twinned city with Shanghai. From the 1890s onwards, small numbers of Chinese began to set up businesses catering to the Chinese sailors and some married working-class British women, resulting in many British-born Eurasian Chinese being…

  • Getting Around

    Going Underground

    Dramatically busy, feeling like a rock concert mosh pit, with shouts of ‘can you move further down please’ as you manoeuvre and contort like some standing game of Twister, generally a sweltering hot sweatbox with suspicious and potent odours. But we wouldn’t have it any other way. Still one of the most reliable and frequent underground services in the world, it helps connect London. The London Underground is the iconic transport network of the capital, but given the history and development of the tube, it can seem quite like an ancient labyrinth, near impossible to navigate! With 11 lines, 270 stations and 400km of track, it can be quite daunting…

  • Mental Health

    Travelling Anxiety

    Everyone gets that worry when at the airport or when travelling, that nagging anxious feeling. I always think about the film ‘Home Alone’ when Kevin’s mum is on the plane and convinced that she has forgotten something, a bit extreme as she has forgotten her youngest son. But what if you have anxiety in your day to day life? Almost 3 million people in the UK have an anxiety disorder, including (but not limited to) post traumatic, obsessive compulsive, social and generalised anxiety. Travel anxiety is a complex condition, related to a fear or worry related to travel. This may prevent people from travelling and making excuses for booking trips.…

  • Travel Inspiration

    Travelling Is A Privilege

    Travelling can have an immense positive impact on a person’s life. It broadens the mind, changes outlooks and perspectives on life. The potential exposure to new ideas, customs and beliefs can all lead to a personal growth. Travel changed my life. From living and studying overseas at the age of 18, to marrying my husband in our favourite holiday destination. It has taught me about the world, the people in it, and myself. It has shown me that there is an amazing enomorous world out there and that I am capable of surviving in it. Travelling has made me more aware of cultural sensitive topics and more tolerant and accepting…

  • Europe

    Healing Waters – Budapest’s Thermal Baths

    Budapest sits on a complex network of almost 125 thermal springs, and this thermal-water reserve is one of the largest in the world, especially for a capital city. Budapest is therefore rich in world-class healing baths and ‘taking the waters’ has been a part of everyday life. There can be few places in the world where water is as lavishly celebrated. The healing powers of the hot springs were first discovered in 100 AD, when Romans settled at Aquincum, which is now part of Budapest. Then it was the Turks, who occupied Hungary during the 16th century, who built the baths and developed the spa culture. The water contains calcium, magnesium, hydrocarbonate, alkalis, chloride, sulfate and fluoride. Some of…

  • Travel Hacks

    Budget Flying

    For those whose wanderlust doesn’t quite match their income, flying to destinations with budget airlines can be a compromise to get to those destinations. Although the fares may be cheaper, there are some other ‘prices to pay’ and here are some tips to make your experience a bit more pleasurable. Hand luggage can quickly add pounds to your booking. Depending on where you are travelling to and for how long, hand luggage only can be a sensible option. Do I really need 21 bikinis for three days? Some airlines will only permit one piece of hand luggage, so you cannot even take a small bag in addition. Some others will permit…

  • Europe

    Ruins to Rebirth – Budapest’s Ruin Pubs

    In the quiet heart of the old Jewish Quarter of Budapest, there is an unexpected emerging bar scene. From the abandoned homes and businesses, has grown an eclectic nightlife. The Jewish Quarter is the smallest in Budapest, yet it currently has the highest population density. The Jewish district is full with the historical remains of the Jewish community that once thrived there. There are three synagogues in the area, with the Dohány Synagogue being the largest and, indeed, the second largest in the entire world. Sadly, the tragic effects of the Holocaust ravaged the area and stripped it of its population and identity. Luckily, the Jewish culture is not only something of the past. The district is experiencing…

  • Europe

    Brainstorming Budapest

    Before travelling, it is always recommended to do your research so that you are prepared for your destination. Whether that is confirming which country you are going to, the currency they use or the language. For this trip, this is unfortunately things that have required investigation before we travel today! When you travel, remember that a foreign country is not designed to make you comfortable. It is designed to make its own people comfortable Budapest is voted as one of the world’s most beautiful cities worldwide. From a quick google search, it is easy to see why. The architecture, spanning neoclassical to art nouveau, Castles and Parliament buildings, with the…

  • Travel Inspiration

    Be A Traveller, Not A Tourist

    Tourist and Traveller seem closely linked and almost interchangeable terms to describe someone who travels… however the word tourist can be uttered with such distain and to an extent quite derogatory, especially around the West End of London. So what is the difference? There are some inherent characteristics that separate travellers and tourists. Generally tourists stick out more than travellers. Whether this is because they are in massive groups, waving selfie sticks or throwing up ‘peace signs’ in front of the famous landmark. This is all very cliched behaviour that I am sure the vast majority of tourists don’t do these things, but as a Londoner, I am constantly dodging…

  • Travel Features,  United Kingdom

    Britain’s Forgotten Mother Tongues

    International Mother Language Day is recognised by UNESCO on the 21st February each year, celebrating linguistic diversity and promoting multilingual education. There are an astounding 2464 languages listed as vulnerable, and at potential risk of vanishing, from almost 6000 languages worldwide. Almost 10% of these languages are critically endangered. It is possible that almost 600 languages may become extinct in a single generation. In the UK, there are 11 languages that are listed as vulnerable, and UNESCO registered 2 of these languages as extinct previously, but a resurgence and revitalisation has forced UNESCO to reconsider this classification. Manx or Manx Gaelic is the native Gaelic derived language of the Isle…

  • London by Locals

    Old Royal Naval College & Painted Hall, Greenwich

    The Old Royal Naval College is the centrepiece of maritime Greenwich, just located on the River Thames towards the east of London. Maritime Greenwich is a listed UNESCO site, including Queens House, Royal Observatory and Greenwich Park (blog post to come!) What is now the Old Royal Naval College was once originally the site of the Palace of Placentia (Greenwich Palace) but came into disrepair and was demolished before the start of the 18th century. The site then became the Royal Hospital/Greenwich Hospital, where sailors would live once they retired (hospital originating from the word hospitality, meaning a place to stay rather than a place to receive medical care). The plan was…

  • Europe

    I’ll Meet You in Paris

    Paris is just 300 miles away from London, and with fantastic transport links with the Eurostar, EuroTunnel and Channel Crossing Ferry, I have visited the French Capital on a number of occasions. Here are the best things to do and see in Paris Arc de Triomphe The icon Arc de Triomphe is found at the end of the Champes-Elysees and is a monument to the fallen during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. It is found in the centre of a roundabout with 12 avenues radiating from the centre. This means this junction a little bit scary as it is very busy with cars, best to use one of the…

  • Oceania,  Travel Inspiration

    Dare To Be Wise – Study Abroad

    I finished my A-Levels in 2004 and the plan was to go to University. I did not want to go to a London based University as I wanted to have the experience of independence and freedom. At 18 years old, I believed that I was fearless and brave and applied to University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. Pretty much the furthest University from London. I had heard of the University before from some friends from New Zealand and went online to find the course and applied. The application process itself was pretty straightforward. I completed an application form and made the submission (much easier than UCAS!). I was given…

  • United Kingdom

    The White Cliffs of Dover

    The famous white cliffs of Dover on the Kent coastline has always been a focal point for people entering and leaving the UK. With is close proximity to mainland Europe, Dover was the home to the first settlers to Britain with historical relevance from the Bronze age. When the Romans expanded through Europe though, Dover was the start of the network connecting the UK to Europe. The White Cliffs are part of the National Trust and for a small fee you are able to walk along the cliffs. The cliffs themselves stretch for about 8 miles! Apparently on a clear day, you can see France from this viewpoint (To be…

  • Oceania,  Travel Inspiration

    Bucket List – Bungee Jumping

    A bungee/bungy jump is something that I always wanted to do and living in New Zealand, home of the world’s first permanent commercial bungee site near Queenstown, I knew that this is where I would need to take the leap of faith! Bungee jumping has it origins on the small pacific island of Vanuatu, where young men would dive off tall platforms with vines attached to their ankles, as a rite of passage into adulthood. As a celebration of completing my degree, I decided to do the jump at Kawarau River in Queenstown. This site has been open since 1988 (almost as old as me!) and at only 43m high, it…

  • United Kingdom

    People Make Glasgow

    Glasgow is often given a bad reputation compared to its elegant and sophisticated sister Edinburgh, being more industrial and gothic to the pretty and romantic capital city but for what Glasgow may lack in aesthetics it makes up for in charm and character. Glasgow was crowned the City of Architecture, Capital of Culture and Commonwealth Games Host in 2014. What was once a city of gangs and slums, now shines with tolerance and diversity. George Square & Merchant City George Square and the City Chambers is the grand space that forms the city centre (almost like Trafalgar Square in London). There are some prominent statues in the square and depending…

  • United Kingdom

    Brighton Rocks

    Brighton is an iconic seaside town on the south coast of England. This resort is a day-trip haven in the summer months for Londoners, giving it the nickname ‘London-by-the-sea’. A lovely clean pebble beach, with lots of little shops and arcades all the way along. Beautiful in the summer months as well as a stroll along in the winter and you can’t go without pier doughnuts! Brighton Pier is open all year round so you can enjoy all the fun of the seaside any time of year. From fish ‘n’ chips to arcade games and funfair rides and free deck chairs. The pier does get very busy so be prepared for some crowding. The Lanes…

  • Food and Drink

    Borough Market

    Borough market is one of the largest and oldest markets in London. This fresh food market has been situated near London Bridge since before 1014, and it has a prime location along the wharf and docks of London. Although no longer used as a wholesale market, it is still open to the public on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays just a short walk down from London Bridge and nestled next to Southwark Cathedral. Many of the Market’s stallholders are themselves producers, where there is no chain or middle-man. The Market’s stalls, shops and restaurants reflect London’s status as a truly global city, with traditional British produce sitting alongside regional specialities…

  • United Kingdom

    Exploring Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is one of the prettiest cities I have ever visited. This historic old town has a wondrous range of activities and things to do, with heritage, culture and festivals. The contrasts of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Sites of the Old Town and New Town has bundles of history. The city was leading the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century and retains its cosmopolitan feel with its summer festivals. Having lived in Dunedin (Edinburgh of the South) in New Zealand, before visiting Edinburgh, it was really extraordinary to see the similarities. Mostly with the street names and styling of buildings and monuments, but they really did attempt to make Dunedin an Edinburgh…

  • Oceania

    Dunner Stunner

    From 2005 to 2007 I moved from my home in London to Dunedin, New Zealand to study at the prestigious University of Otago. I was lucky enough to be accepted based on my A-Levels and applied for my student visa and I was on my way! (Obvs there was lots more planning but that is part of a different post!) Dunedin is a student town towards the south of New Zealand’s South Island, with a student population of about 20% (of its 120000). Dunedin means ‘Edinburgh of the South’ as it originates from the Gaelic for Edinburgh and has a proud Scottish History, with a statue of Robert Burns in…